Spooky Sightings In Chapin

Spooky Sightings In Chapin

My daughters recently got my wife and I hooked on the AMC series “Walking Dead”, appropriate timing given that Halloween is upon us. Don’t be surprised tomorrow if you see some zombified characters that look like they were in an episode of that TV series.  On Wednesday the 28th at 11 AM, pre-schoolers from the Mr. Horeb School will be making their annual Halloween appearance at the EXIT Midlands Realty office on Clark Street in Chapin. Stop by and have some snacks but you were forewarned that some little goblin gobblets might be running around!


Speaking of Halloween, ever wonder what the deal is with it and how it got started? Wonder no more!! Here is a Reader's Digest condensed version of the history of Halloween.


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Halloween’s origins date back to the ancient Celtic festival of Samhain (pronounced sow-in). The Celts, who lived 2,000 years ago in the area that is now Ireland, the United Kingdom and northern France, celebrated their new year on November 1. This day marked the end of summer and the harvest and the beginning of the dark, cold winter, a time of year that was often associated with human death. Celts believed that on the night before the new year, the boundary between the worlds of the living and the dead became blurred. On the night of October 31 they celebrated Samhain.


By 43 A.D., the Roman Empire had conquered the majority of Celtic territory. In the course of the four hundred years that they ruled the Celtic lands, twofestivals of Roman origin were combined with the traditional Celtic celebration of Samhain. The first was Feralia, a day in late October when the Romans traditionally commemorated the passing of the dead. The second was a day to honor Pomona, theRoman goddess of fruit and trees. The symbol of Pomona is the apple and the incorporation of this celebration into Samhain probably explains the tradition of “bobbing” for apples that is practiced today on Halloween.


On May 13, 609 A.D., Pope Boniface IV dedicated the Pantheon in Rome in honor of all Christian martyrs, and the Catholic feast of All Martyrs Day was established in the Western church. Pope Gregory III (731–741) later expanded the festival to include all saints as well as all martyrs, and moved the observance from May 13 to November 1. By the 9th century the influence of Christianity had spread into Celtic lands, where it gradually blended with and supplanted the older Celtic rites. In 1000 A.D., the church would make November 2 All Souls’ Day, a day to honor the dead. It is widely believed today that the church was attempting to replace the Celtic festival of the dead with a related, but church-sanctioned holiday. All Souls Day was celebrated similarly to Samhain, with big bonfires, parades, and dressing up in costumes as saints, angels and devils.


In the second half of the nineteenth century, America was flooded with new immigrants. These new immigrants, especially the millions of Irish fleeing Ireland’s potato famine of 1846, helped to popularize the celebration of Halloween nationally. Taking from Irish and English traditions, Americans began to dress up in costumes and go house to house asking for food or money, a practice that eventually became today’s “trick-or-treat” tradition. Young women believed that on Halloween they could divine the name or appearance of their future husband by doing tricks with yarn, apple parings or mirrors.


In the late 1800s, there was a move in America to mold Halloween into a holiday more about community and neighborly get-togethers than about ghosts, pranks and witchcraft. At the turn of the century, Halloween parties for both children and adults became the most common way to celebrate the day.By the 1950's, Halloween had evolved into a holiday directed mainly at the young. Due to the high numbers of young children during the fifties baby boom, parties moved from town civic centers into the classroom or home, where they could be more easily accommodated. Between 1920 and 1950, the centuries-old practice of trick-or-treating was also revived. Trick-or-treating was a relatively inexpensive way for an entire community to share the Halloween celebration.Parties focused on games, foods of the season and festive costumes.


So there you have it!


Live the good life but be wary of the walking dead on halloween night!!!!


Gary


Gary Heiligman Real Estate Professional advocating and negotiating on behalf of  Buyers and Sellers in  communities surrounding Lake Murray South Carolina including, ChapinIrmo, and Lexington. Real Estate with Gary Heiligman associated with EXIT Midlands Realty, email garyscexit@gmail.com or call 803-271-9544


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Phone: 803-467-1694
Dated: October 27th 2015
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About Maria: Maria Kitchens is a Real Estate Professional who has lived in Chapin, SC, for the past nine years wi...

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Location & Address

EXIT Midlands Realty
200 Clark St PO Box 807
Chapin, SC
803-753-4961
803-345-6126